Book Review: Speechless

SpeechlessSpeechless

by Hannah Harrington

Published: September 2012 by Mira Ink

Version: Ebook from publisher and Netgalley (review my own, honest opinion)

Rating: 4.5 sofas

Everyone knows that Chelsea Knot can’t keep a secret

Until now. Because the last secret she shared turned her into a social outcast—and nearly got someone killed.

Now Chelsea has taken a vow of silence—to learn to keep her mouth shut, and to stop hurting anyone else. And if she thinks keeping secrets is hard, not speaking up when she’s ignored, ridiculed and even attacked is worse.

But there’s strength in silence, and in the new friends who are, shockingly, coming her way—people she never noticed before; a boy she might even fall for. If only her new friends can forgive what she’s done. If only she can forgive herself.

I was excited to read this as I have heard nothing but good things about it. The idea seemed pretty simple; a loudmouth girl whose outbursts had serious consequences decides to take a vow of silence.

However, the story runs much deeper than that. It explores as teenagers (and adults) how easy it is to give into peer pressure. And how we convince ourselves that things we say or do aren’t really *that* bad. This book turns that all on a head, and shows that actually the little things can have dire results. And even if we might not remember it, something we say or do can have a profound effect on someone else, and therefore we should really think before we act.

The idea of taking a vow of silence baffles me. Obviously it would be totally impractical in a working day, but it is such a powerful notion in this book. It really highlights how much we rely on our voice, and different ways of expressing it. 

Although this book focusses on silence, ironically, it is also about speaking out. Chelsea is an easy target because she can’t really fight back. But does this allow her to be bullied?

Ultimately Speechless is about Chelsea’s journey of self discovery. Learning that being cool or popular doesn’t always equate with being happy. You should never have to be horrible to someone or hide your true self in order to gain friends. Asha is the personification of this; she doesn’t care what anyone else thinks. And if that means she is ignored or bullied by the ‘popular’ group, then thats okay because she is true to herself.

I fell in love with Speechless. I adore issue books and this one certainly did not disappoint. It hit me a lot deeper than I expected, with the writing both emotional and beautiful. Perfect for any teenagers, it highlights the importance of standing up for yourself and not following the crowd. Highly recommended; 4.5 sofas!  

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Letterbox Love #36

Letterbox Love is a meme hosted by Lynsey of Narratively Speaking whereby book lovers can exhibit the books they received this week.

I have a sole book this week so no vlog to show you. The book deserves a post though!  

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Bought:

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

Eee! This is a signed copy purchased through Waterstones. Such an emotional book, I needed my own copy. 

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What did you receive this week? Have you read any of my books and do you think it should be at the top or the bottom of my to read pile?  I’d love to hear from you! 

Waiting on Wednesday #45

Waiting on Wednesday is a weekly event, hosted by Jill at Breaking the Spine, that spotlights upcoming releases we’re eagerly anticipating.

The Rule of Three

One shocking afternoon, computers around the globe shut down in a viral catastrophe. At sixteen-year-old Adam Daley’s high school, the problem first seems to be a typical electrical outage, until students discover that cell phones are down, municipal utilities are failing, and a few computer-free cars like Adam’s are the only vehicles that function. Driving home, Adam encounters a storm tide of anger and fear as the region becomes paralyzed. Soon—as resources dwindle, crises mount, and chaos descends—he will see his suburban neighborhood band together for protection. And Adam will understand that having a police captain for a mother and a retired government spy living next door are not just the facts of his life but the keys to his survival.

Computers shutting down? Sounds like a nightmare to me! The Rule of Three looks like its going to be an amazing post-apocalyptic adventure.        

Due to be released by Farrar Straus Giroux in January 2014.

 What are you looking forward to this week?  Please share your WoW in the comments!

Book Review: Acid

AcidAcid

by Emma Pass

Published: April 2013 by Random House 

Version: Ebook from publisher and Netgalley (review my own, honest opinion)

Rating: 4.5 sofas

The year is 2113. In Jenna Strong’s world, ACID—the most brutal controlling police force in history—rule supreme. No throwaway comment or whispered dissent goes unnoticed—or unpunished. And it was ACID agents who locked Jenna away for life, for a horrendous crime she struggles to remember. But Jenna’s violent prison time has taught her how to survive by any means necessary. 

When a mysterious rebel group breaks her out, she must use her strength, speed, and skill to stay one step ahead of ACID, and try to uncover the truth about what really happened on that terrible night two years ago. They have taken her life, her freedom, and her true memories away from her. How can she reclaim anything when she doesn’t know who to trust?

Strong, gritty writing, irresistible psychological suspense, and action consume the novel as Jenna struggles to survive against the all-controlling ACID. Seriously sinister stuff.

From the cover alone, I knew I had to read this book. It looks awesome with a powerful protagonist. I got approved on Netgalley for it around the release, but for one reason or another I never got round to it. BIG MISTAKE. I know other bloggers who absolutely adore it, and now I know why.

We meet Jenna in dystopian-Britain who has been put in jail for the murder of her parents. One of the things I love about dystopian novels is how real they can be, and scary to think that this COULD be our future. Acid does just that. In the future, ACID is the governing body, and they are not afraid to show it.

I think Jenna is one of my favourite female main characters. She has a lot of courage and spunk, especially when we learn about some of the things she has been through. Although she is continuously knocked down she never gives up, and I really admire her for that. There was a little bit of romance, but I liked that it didn’t overpower the story itself. 

The only reason I couldn’t give Acid 5 sofas was because the story was just a little too predictable. Although I think the storyline is great and there are several twists along the way, you just can’t get rid of the stereotypical dystopian storyline. As such, I kind of knew where the book was gonna end up, but its how we got there that really makes the story unique.

If Acid is a book that (like me) you didn’t read on its release, I implore you to do so now. It is original and thrilling, with plenty of twists to keep you on the edge of your seat. One of the most intense debut novels of this year! 4.5 sofas.

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Letterbox Love #35

Letterbox Love is a meme hosted by Lynsey of Narratively Speaking whereby book lovers can exhibit the books they received this week.

A tiny haul for me this week!        

Received for Review:

The Queen of Dreams by Peter Hamilton

I wasn’t expecting this in the post but it looks amazing, and I love the squirrel on the cover! Thanks Random House.  

Twinmaker by Sean Williams

My first review book from Electric Monkey, and its a whopper!

Bought:

I Am J  by Cris Beam

It’s Our Prom (So Deal With It) by Julie Ann Peters

Borrowed:

In Bloom by Matthew Crow

I was lucky enough to meet Jim at an event this week, and he very kindly lent me his copy of this book! He says its BETTER THAN TFIOS. 

What did you receive this week? Have you read any of my books and do you think it should be at the top or the bottom of my to read pile?  I’d love to hear from you! 

Letterbox Love #34

Letterbox Love is a meme hosted by Lynsey of Narratively Speaking whereby book lovers can exhibit the books they received this week.

Double event time this week! Apologies for the lateness of this post, but it has been manic.        

Received for Review:

Geek Girl 2: Model Misfit by Holly Smale

I’m SO happy to finally have my own copy of this, thanks to Harper Collins! I read the ebook version, and review to come soon! (Spoiler: It was epic 😀 )  

The Naturals by Jennifer Lynn Barnes

Thanks very much to Quercus! Look out for the cover reveal posted on Monday for this one.

Shadowlark by Meagan Spooner

Thanks Random House! This looks good but is the second in a series so not sure when I’ll be able to read it.

Bought:

Dangerous Girls by Abigail Haas

How I Live Now by Meg Rosoff

Memoirs of a Teenage Amnesiac by Gabrielle Zevin

The Running Dream by Wendelin van Draanen

Won:

Love Is a Number by Lee Monroe

This is a second copy. I originally won this from Michelle at Much Loved Books, but thought it had got lost in the post so they kindly sent a second copy, and now I have both of them! I don’t understand the postal system.

Swapped:

Call Down Thunder by Daniel Finn

Vanished by Meg Cabot

Thanks very much to Georgia for these! I love a good book swap 😀

Tempest and Vortex by Julie Cross

Shift by Em Bailey

Dead to You by Lisa McMann

Thanks Lucy! I can’t wait to read the Julie Cross books and Dead to You was a lovely surprise.

The Farm by Emily McKay

Thanks to Katie for this one which I’ve had my eye on for a while!

What did you receive this week? Have you read any of my books and do you think it should be at the top or the bottom of my to read pile?  I’d love to hear from you! 

Cover Reveal: The Naturals

I am thrilled to be able to reveal today the UK cover of The Naturals, the start of a new series from Quercus by Jennifer Lynn Barnes. Due to be released on the 7th November, this series looks like its full of power-strong girls including Cassie. A school working with the FBI for teens with exceptional abilities? Sounds like all sorts of awesome to me! 

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Cassie Hobbes is not like most teenagers. Most teenagers don’t lose their mother in a bloody, unsolved kidnapping. Most teenagers can’t tell who you are, where you’re from and how you’re likely to behave within moments of meeting you. And most teenagers don’t get chosen to join The Naturals.

Identified by the FBI as uniquely gifted, Cassie is recruited to an elite school where a small number of teens are trained to hone their exceptional abilities.

For Cassie, trying to make friends with the girls, and to figure out the two very different, very hot boys, is challenging enough. But when a serial killer begins recreating the details of her mother’s horrific crime scene, she realises just how dangerous life in The Naturals could be…